Philosophy

I believe that marketing should help you to achieve your goals efficiently, make the most of your resources and avoid unnecessary costs

Marketing isn’t just promotion

When many people say the word “marketing”, appoint “marketing” managers or even sell “marketing” services, what they actually mean is “promotion” – using tools like advertising, websites or glossy brochures.

No amount of money spent on promotion is likely to have any positive impact if you’re otherwise offering the wrong things, the wrong way to the wrong people.

Unfortunately, no amount of money spent on promotion is likely to have any positive impact if you’re otherwise offering the wrong things, the wrong way to the wrong people.

Marketing is actually the ongoing process of identifying and satisfying customer needs. Done properly, marketing will help you to do things people actually want and deliver them the right way, at the right price, in the right place, at the right time.

Marketing can therefore genuinely help you to operate efficiently, make the most of your resources and avoid unnecessary costs.

Communication isn’t just about what you’ve got to say

It’s also about listening, because if you want people to listen to you, first you have to listen to them and understand the things they want, they’re interested in and that they’re trying to achieve. Burning money shouting about yourself when nobody’s listening is a folly to be avoided.

Communication is also what others have to say about you, which can be more influential and carry further than anything you say about yourself. What you do and how you do it can therefore speak volumes about you – without a penny spent on promotional tools and activities.

Marketing jargon isn’t necessary

Marketing people are infamous for their use of jargon and buzzwords, which is strange as they’re supposed to be aware of what their audiences want – and who wants to be on the receiving end of a load of marketing jargon? That’d be nobody.

Who wants to be on the receiving end of a load of marketing jargon? That’d be nobody.

Those spouting jargon and buzzwords appear to live under the misguided impression that confusing and baffling others makes them sound more intelligent and/or important – but it’s never the recipient’s fault if the message they’re given is unclear.

Alas, jargon is also used by some to deceive. Simple tasks are made to sound horrifically complex, justifying a fee that’s much larger than you’d pay if you knew how not very complicated the task actually is.